A Double Dose of Pam

I have read two books recently that were written by Pam Bachorz: Drought and Candor. Both books received a four star rating from me on Goodreads (goodreads.com), and I am reviewing Drought for you here.

     Ruby Prosser dreams of escaping the Congregation and the early-nineteenth century lifestyle that’s been practiced since the community was first enslaved.
She plots to escape the vicious Darwin West, his cruel Overseers, and the daily struggle to gather the life-prolonging Water that keeps the Congregants alive and gives Darwin his wealth and power. But if Ruby leaves, the Congregation will die without the secret ingredient that makes the Water special: her blood.
So she stays.
But when Ruby meets Ford, the new Overseer who seems barely older than herself, her desire for freedom is too strong. He’s sympathetic, irresistible, forbidden—and her only access to the modern world. Escape with Ford would be so simple, but can Ruby risk the terrible price, dooming the only world she’s ever known?

I finished Drought yesterday and decided to take a day to process my thoughts about the book before rating it and writing a review. I’ve read a lot of less than favorable reviews for Drought, and although I get what most of these reviewers are saying, I don’t completely agree with them. Are there parts of the plot that require you to suspend belief? Yes. Are there some holes in the plot that could have been knitted together better? Absolutely. However, for me at least, I think the strengths of Pam Bachorz’s novel outweigh its weaknesses.

Bachorz has written a strong heroine, Ruby, who is easy to identify with and who seems quite real. While Ruby’s plight is far from typical and is infuriating, she experiences many things a teenager would: young love, mother/daughter conflicts, loss of loved ones, unwanted affections from a boy, and the persistent need to think for herself and to be free. Ruby longs for a better life, which is something most of us can relate to.

I also like what Bachorz does with the character of Ford—how she effectively shows the internal conflict he has between what he feels he must do for his family and what he must do to Ruby’s family because it’s his “job.” In doing so, Bachorz also explores the dichotomy of doing what’s necessary for survival vs. what’s right as she explores this age-old argument.

The relationship between Ruby and Ford is not only forbidden, it is what holds this story together and makes it easier to overlook the flaws of the plot. Although I think the meat of the story is in the relationship between Ruby and Ford, I do wish more backstory regarding Otto and the history of the Congregation had been woven into the story. There are a lot of unanswered questions that may not be necessary to the Ruby/Ford plotline, but would have definitely tightened up the other veins of the story and filled in some of the holes.

While I’m not reviewing Candor, I did want to give you a little tidbit about this novel that will leave you with chills at the end:

 In the model community of Candor, Florida, every teen wants to be like Oscar Banks. The son of the town’s founder, Oscar earns straight A’s, is student-body president, and is in demand for every club and cause. But Oscar has a secret. He knows that parents bring their teens to Candor to make them respectful, compliant–perfect–through subliminal Messages that carefully correct and control their behavior. And Oscar’ s built a business sabotaging his father’s scheme with Messages of his own, getting his clients out before they’re turned. After all, who would ever suspect the perfect Oscar Banks? Then he meets Nia, the girl he can’t stand to see changed. Saving Nia means losing her forever. Keeping her in Candor, Oscar risks exposure . . . and more.

Happy reading!

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. April
    Apr 08, 2012 @ 00:25:53

    I appreciate your comments about Drought. I read this novel, too, and was fascinated by it, but wondered if it had a ‘hook’ that would really pull in middle readers. Thanks for sharing this.

    Reply

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