Why YA? The Fault in Our Stars, that’s why.

The Fault in Our Stars

Diagnosed with Stage IV thyroid cancer at 12, Hazel was prepared to die until, at 14, a medical miracle shrunk the tumours in her lungs… for now.

Two years post-miracle, sixteen-year-old Hazel is post-everything else, too; post-high school, post-friends and post-normalcy. And even though she could live for a long time (whatever that means), Hazel lives tethered to an oxygen tank, the tumours tenuously kept at bay with a constant chemical assault.

Enter Augustus Waters. A match made at cancer kid support group, Augustus is gorgeous, in remission, and shockingly to her, interested in Hazel. Being with Augustus is both an unexpected destination and a long-needed journey, pushing Hazel to re-examine how sickness and health, life and death, will define her and the legacy that everyone leaves behind.

This book makes me want to hug my children more and thank God seventy-two times a day that all four of my children are healthy and happy (most of the time). It makes me appreciate my husband more (please don’t tell him I said that…on the Interwebs).

You see, my husband was diagnosed with Stage III colon cancer nine years ago, at the age of 32. Stage III means the cancer is treatable, but it has invaded the lymph nodes, thereby entering the bloodstream, making for a poorer prognosis. My husband was lucky. He had surgery and underwent nearly five months of chemo and has been cancer free for nearly nine years now. This is a miracle and a blessing for our family.

But I digress. This is a book review about a girl with terminal cancer, and given my life experience it’s no wonder I crawled right inside Hazel’s world.

It took me about ten days to read this book because life kept getting in the way of my reading. I stayed up way past my bedtime two nights in a row to finish it, which was difficult to do at times due to the steady flow of tears. It was worth feeling tired and a little cranky so I could finally finish this book.

Hazel is not someone you feel sorry for. She simply will not allow you to. What she will do, however, is give you a honest picture of what life with cancer looks like, feels like, sounds like, and on occasion, smells like. Hazel is bad ass, and someone you want to know. She’s smart and understands things about life most of us never will. She sees things we miss because she pays attention. Hazel worries about those she will leave behind and is fully aware of the devastation that will follow her death, referring to herself as a “grenade.”

But don’t despair. Hazel has a wicked sense of humor and although she is painfully aware of the graveness of her situation, she often comments on the irony of things and sees humor in even the most serious situations.

Meeting Augustus at a cancer support group is serendipitous, cathartic, and just what Hazel needs, despite her prolonged resistance. She eventually learns that resistance is futile, and embraces the gift Augustus becomes in her life. Augustus is bad ass in his own right, and you can’t help rooting for the two of them.

The Wonder of Wonder

I came to hear about Wonder via Twitter through the flurry of discussion my various Twitter teacher and librarian friends were having. I have to admit, I felt a little out of the loop. Well…I’m still fairly new to Twitter and most of my Twitter friends are newly established contacts, so I guess it makes sense I felt out of the loop. I started paying attention to what was being said, and one well established Twitter/Facebook friend, the amazing Paul W. Hankins, couldn’t say enough about this book.

When I finished reading Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper a couple of weeks ago and casually asked on Facebook, “What to read next?” Paul immediately responded with: “Wonder by R. J. Palacio.” I had ordered the book the week before and was anxiously awaiting its arrival. When it finally showed up on my doorstep, I began reading it that evening and was immediately drawn in.

Here’s a little bit about the book:       Wonder

I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.

August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. He’s about to start 5th grade at Beecher Prep, and if you’ve ever been the new kid then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances?

R. J. Palacio has written a spare, warm, uplifting story that will have readers laughing one minute and wiping away tears the next. With wonderfully realistic family interactions (flawed, but loving), lively school scenes, and short chapters, Wonder is accessible to readers of all levels.

Much of Auggie’s  story is told from his perspective, but the true depth of the story (and characters) materializes as other significant characters come forward to share their perspectives regarding their lives with Auggie. They bare their souls and allow us as readers to share in their joy and pain and blindingly honest truths.

Wonder is not a “woe-is-me” book. It is not a copy-cat book. It is not a book you’ll read and then shake your head thinking that you’ve read this story somewhere else before.

Wonder is full of rich, well fleshed out characters that will make you laugh, cry, sympathize, feel outrage, and ultimately feel blessed. The tears you shed will be both heartbreaking and of joyful triumphs.

Auggie is a character you will not soon forget.

Join the conversation about Wonder on Twitter: #thewonderofwonder

You can follow me on Twitter @MickiFryhover and R.J. Palacio @RJPalacio

New (to Me) Author Discovery! Yay!

I’ve been reading, reading, reading. Mostly YA lit, of course, but I want to talk about the book I finished over the weekend: Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper. I have a few of her books on my bookshelves in my classroom, but this is the first of her books I have read. I assure you I will be reading every one of those other books of hers I have on my shelves. Eventually. My “to-read” list is VERY long, you see. And getting longer thanks to my Twitter and Facebook friends who keep recommending so many incredible titles.

  What can I say about this book about a ten year old girl named Melody?

In a word: outstanding. What I really liked about this book is the fact that while I found the narrator, Melody, to be extremely sympathetic, I did not feel sorry for her. I even found myself getting irritated with her at times, as I have with so many other main characters from other books. I’m pretty sure that was Sharon Draper’s goal when she wrote this book.

As I read, I couldn’t help thinking this book would make an excellent choice for a lit circle with a focus on freedom as a theme. Melody is trapped in her own mind and in a body that constantly betrays her. Freedom is something Melody yearns for, but never comes close to achieving.

Although there are those who feel this book doesn’t quite ring true for one reason or another, I recommend this book to everyone–especially parents, teachers, and students. You never know when the person whom you assume is not worth your time or effort based on physical appearance just might be someone like Melody.

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